European Union woes should not discourage EAC

One possible explanation of the slowing down could be the impact of Brexit and the turmoil – if I can call it so – it has created in the European Union. Until up to recently, the European Union was considered by many as a good example of unifying economies for the common progress of the members. Now that the future of the bloc is seen to be in doubt, even our East African Community members may be beginning to think that the whole East African project might not be viable in the long-run after all.

Editor,

RE: “Is East African integration slowing down?” (The New Times, March 21).

One possible explanation of the slowing down could be the impact of Brexit and the turmoil – if I can call it so – it has created in the European Union. Until up to recently, the European Union was considered by many as a good example of unifying economies for the common progress of the members. Now that the future of the bloc is seen to be in doubt, even our East African Community members may be beginning to think that the whole East African project might not be viable in the long-run after all.

I personally believe that Brexit and the other challenges facing the European Union today should instead provide the EAC partner states an important lesson that would help them formulate a better East African Community than the one they had envisaged, even if it meant revisiting the whole concept.

But abandoning key joint projects, such as the envisaged railway, would be a missed opportunity.

Seth

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It’s clear there are some dishonest members who are bent on stabbing their peers at the back. I know there are national interests every country is pursuing, but that should not be to the detriment of a good working relationship in the community.

There have been abrasive and bare knuckles in the way things are done. If this is not managed well then the Njonjo prophecy will come to pass. I hope I am wrong but I fear I may be right.

Tom

 

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