[EDITORIAL] Radicalisation can be prevented with the right approach

As the world continues to reel from the effects of Islamic radicalization, it is time it woke up to reality; there is no better way to fight it than its prevention.

As the world continues to reel from the effects of Islamic radicalization, it is time it woke up to reality; there is no better way to fight it than its prevention.

The key lies in not only weeding out radicals from our midst, but not giving them an excuse to exist in the first place.

If one looks carefully why many young Muslims in Europe are flocking the ISIS ranks in mindboggling numbers, it is not difficult to find answers.

France, for example, a country with the biggest population of Muslims in Western Europe has also seen it contribute to the increase to ISIS ranks and radicalization.

Muslims feel marginalized and their neighbourhoods are neglected. Social services that other neighbourhoods taken for granted are extended poorly. They are left to their own devise.

In the end, the youth become ripe for radicalization and indoctrination; moving time bombs.

Rwanda was not spared from the spreading global Islamic fundamentalism, but it was very alert and nipped it in the bud and several people arrested.

It takes the threat very seriously, and unlike other places where the Muslim community has been sidelined and looked at with suspicion, it has embraced them.

Just late this week, the top police command interacted with over 100 young Muslim students. The goal was to see how they could cooperate in fighting crime, and evidently radicalization was top of the agenda.

These are the kinds of actions that can help fight the spread of ISIS ideology, not drone attacks or targeted killings. Once young Muslims have a sense of belonging, there will be no need to go to Syria or cross into Somalia to join Al Shabab.

editorial@newtimes.co.rw

 

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