Genocide fugitives shouldn’t be given a platform

Editor, Just as we mark the 16th commemoration of the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi, unfortunate reports continue to emerge. The weeks of commemoration seem to be longer to Genocide Survivors than all the weeks of the year combined because of the bitter memories that come to mind.
While Rwandans fight Genocide denial, some are attempting to advocate it.
While Rwandans fight Genocide denial, some are attempting to advocate it.

Editor,

Just as we mark the 16th commemoration of the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi, unfortunate reports continue to emerge.

The weeks of commemoration seem to be longer to Genocide Survivors than all the weeks of the year combined because of the bitter memories that come to mind. The news is filled by tragic pictures and genocide testimonies.

During this time people accord befitting burials to the remains of several genocide victims, while others talk about their lives before the Genocide. During this period people talk about the heroes who saved their lives.

Well, what dismayed me this week were reports in your paper that some defense lawyers at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) and many jurists continue to give platform to indicted genocide fugitives.

Inviting people like Eugene Rwamucyo and Charles Ndereyehe, who are already indicted by Rwanda, to speak at an international conference in Belgium is offensive to Rwandans, especially Genocide Survivors.

To me, the lawyers aren’t only breaking their professional ethics but are being revisionists too. If the notion of Never Again is to be realized, all should ensure that revisionist groups or genocide deniers do not find a way to promote their nefarious agendas.

Martin Safari
Bugesera

 

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