Some people are too poor to contribute to district revenues

Performance contracts in Rwanda not only encourage healthy competition among different districts but also lead to development and promote unity among the masses.

Performance contracts in Rwanda not only encourage healthy competition among different districts but also lead to development and promote unity among the masses.

Through the contract work, there is assurance of better service delivery. Improved results have been generated by greatly relying on the advice of the previous evaluation teams.

The provincial evaluation teams present their findings at the third-phase performance contract meetings.

Many districts have improved to the high score of 70 per cent which is now the least mark in many provinces. This brings about steady improvement in districts’ performance even at the national level.

However I disagree with Minister Musoni who said that they should “tap the available resources”. Which available resources does he actually mean? 

He also went ahead to say that there is a case of poor fiscal discipline and that is why people don’t pay revenue.

Is it not true that there are people who are genuinely poor?
The challenges faced in revenue collection can be curbed by privatising the process because it has been successful in other districts.

A district which cannot meet at least 5 per cent of its budget can be taken over by central government.

 I suggest that districts also harness the cooperation with non-governmental organisations and form partnerships to develop with their respective districts.

The final presentations are due to be held this month during the National Dialogue meeting where Mayors will give performance reports to the President of the Republic with whom they signed contracts.

The beauty of it all is that even the local people will have a hand in the evaluation process.

Kabeza

 

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