EDITORIAL: Other countries should pick a leaf from Norway

Many countries harbouring Genocide suspects could learn a few things from Norwegian authorities. The country’s Supreme Court earlier this week approved the extradition of another fugitive wanted in Rwanda for his alleged role in the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

Many countries harbouring Genocide suspects could learn a few things from Norwegian authorities.

The country’s Supreme Court earlier this week approved the extradition of another fugitive wanted in Rwanda for his alleged role in the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

Like many, Eugene Nkuranyabahizi’s past has finally caught up with him, his false sense of assurance that he would get away with impunity in some far away foreign land has been washed away.

This is the second person that the Norwegian authorities have found it fit to send back to Rwanda to face justice, following Charles Bandora who was extradited in 2013 and is awaiting the outcome of his trial.

The most important thing is not extradition – though it is the preferred solution for victims – but making sure Genocide criminals have their rendezvous with justice.

Twenty years is a long time; evidence fades and witnesses pass away, therefore there is need to deal with Genocide cases with haste. If countries are unwilling to send the suspects to Rwanda, the least they can do is to try them in their own courts of law.

For countries who pride themselves as being the bastions of justice, it blows the mind that they still put up with questionable individuals without bothering to met out that same justice.

But as the saying goes, patience is a virtue, the least survivors can do is bid their time and wait for countries still harbouring genocidaires to finally come to their senses.

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