Access to clean water should be national priority

As we mark World Water week, we should take it upon ourselves to reflect on how we manage the water we use and also path ways on how we can secure clean fresh water for those who do not have it. By the end of 2008, Rwanda’s national water coverage stood at 73 percent, a development that directly led to improved sanitation.

As we mark World Water week, we should take it upon ourselves to reflect on how we manage the water we use and also path ways on how we can secure clean fresh water for those who do not have it.

By the end of 2008, Rwanda’s national water coverage stood at 73 percent, a development that directly led to improved sanitation. Despite the significant progress, about 2.7 million people still lack access to safe water.

As the adage goes, “Water is life.” Indeed, it should be a general concern for both government and other stakeholders to ensure that clean water is within reach for all citizens, if livelihoods are to be improved.

Increased access to clean water is the basis on which development goals like a healthy population, curbing child mortality as well as guaranteeing education for all are based.

There have been reports of girls who miss school because they are collecting water, while their counterparts, boys are excelling.

In most African countries, Rwanda inclusive, diarrhea, a result of contaminated water, still ranks the number one killer disease among children under five. Safe water would, therefore, be a very important hygienic measure to curb such deadly water related diseases.

Let’s make it a priority to provide clean fresh water for all and those who have it, should not take it for granted.

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