“Quiet corruption” derailing African economies-WB report

*Rwanda fares well in continental rankings The World Bank on Monday released the 2010 Africa Development Indicators (ADI) Report, revealing a new phenomenon of “Quiet corruption” that is pervasive and widespread especially across Sub-Saharan Africa.

*Rwanda fares well in continental rankings

The World Bank on Monday released the 2010 Africa Development Indicators (ADI) Report, revealing a new phenomenon of “Quiet corruption” that is pervasive and widespread especially across Sub-Saharan Africa.

This new type of corruption is also said to have a disproportionate effect on the poor, with long-term consequences for development.

According to the report, it is mainly attributed to the failure of public servants to deliver goods or services paid for by governments.

The 2010 ADI report, notes that most corruption studies in the past focus on an exchange of money – bribes to powerful political designees or kickbacks to public officials.

This year’s report, however, focused on the way “quiet corruption” leads to an increasingly negative expectation of service delivery systems, causing families to ignore the system.

“Quiet corruption, although smaller in monetary terms, is particularly harmful for the poor, who are more vulnerable and more reliant on government services and public systems to satisfy their most basic needs,” the report observes.

Rwanda fared better than other countries in the region.
It  has the lowest percentage in the incidences of corruption and perceived corruption.

“Quiet corruption does not make the headlines the way bribery scandals do, but it is just as corrosive to societies,” said Shanta Devarajan, Chief Economist for the World Bank’s Africa Region.

“Tackling quiet corruption will require a combination of strong and committed leadership, policies and institutions at the sectoral level, and – most important – increased accountability and participation by citizens,” he further added.

Rwanda registered 19.96 percent of corruption incidence -where firms’ informal payments are likely to be made or kickbacks given to have things done while in the area of perceived corruption the country registered 4.35 percent.

Kenya on the other hand registered 79.2 in corruption incidences-making it the most corrupt country in the East African Community followed by Burundi with 56.46 percent, Uganda with 51.7 percent and Tanzania with 49.47 percent.

In perceived corruption Kenya scored 38.35 percent, Uganda 23.57, Tanzania 19.73 and Burundi 19.71 percent.

D R Congo registered the highest corruption incidences in the Great Lakes region with 83.79 percent and 20 percent of perceived corruption.

Ends

 

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