Organisation of the mind, organizing success

Today The New Times like to pay tribute and warning in one. The implementation of the One UN programme, a restructuring of services in the country, will see 16 different agencies reworked into one command structure and operational flow.

Today The New Times like to pay tribute and warning in one. The implementation of the One UN programme, a restructuring of services in the country, will see 16 different agencies reworked into one command structure and operational flow.

Reorganisation of the UN here—rationalization on a basic level not of what you do, but how you make it happen—is long overdue. There are others in the community even longer overdue.

The Government of Rwanda has been a notorious standout in the efficiency and legal mechanics of its works, but with advanced ICT-integrated facilities and strong training, visa applications, power and water bills and other services can be processed online.

Like the tight-knit origins of this term’s administration, though, the government as a whole for the most part operates with potency and swiftness.

Unfortunately, it is like being a mzungu in an African jungle. While the business community here has been shaping up its act of recent, a majority of operations—including absolutely dozens in the local and international NGO community—are poorly run and organized.

Many times it is disheartening, truly painful and incredibly insulting how lazy and unserious some private practices, including one of Africa’s largest continental airlines, who despite recently-opened modern offices downtown, still forces clients to waits weeks while they ‘email’ correspondents in other cities for ticket changes.

Veins can boil in true contempt.

At the end of the day, though the feeling washes away because we all know that when Rwanda starts seeing business and financial benefits to joining the East African Community, and more options become available, and when someone is willing to work harder and better, the customer will victor.

The United Nations has customers too. The customer is the Rwandan citizen because that is why the UN is here. That is why Ban ki-Moon flies to Kinshasa to deliver speeches to parliament, or why World Food Programme officials tour upcountry villages; because their stated purpose of existence, to make Rwandan lives better lives.

Anyone operating any service has customers, and the existence of said business is reason for said motivation to serve the customer the best.

This extends from the small alimention to the ministries. It includes everyone within and outside that spectrum, and no one is immune from the effects of disorganization and laziness to improve.

This is what the UN today is figuring out and it certainly hopes to be a major step in the right direction for development in this country. We salute them, nod our heads, and say Carry on.

Ends

 

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