NUR students lament lack of internet access

HUYE - Two years after the module teaching system was introduced at the National University of Rwanda (NUR), varsity students are complaining of lack of sufficient resources to conduct research. The students cite lack of reliable internet connection and inadequate computers in the university computer laboratory as some of the challenges they face. “The module system requires students to spend a lot of time doing research and the internet is an important resource here. The university authorities should look into this problem because it is affecting us,” appealed Jean Claude Nyabyenda, a third year student.
Bonfils Safari, the director of quality education at NUR (Photo / J.C. Gakwaya)
Bonfils Safari, the director of quality education at NUR (Photo / J.C. Gakwaya)

HUYE - Two years after the module teaching system was introduced at the National University of Rwanda (NUR), varsity students are complaining of lack of sufficient resources to conduct research.

The students cite lack of reliable internet connection and inadequate computers in the university computer laboratory as some of the challenges they face.

“The module system requires students to spend a lot of time doing research and the internet is an important resource here. The university authorities should look into this problem because it is affecting us,” appealed Jean Claude Nyabyenda, a third year student.

Under the module system, a student is expected to spend 60 percent of the course time doing independent  research while the rest is spent attending  lectures.

Some students also complained of insufficient practical sessions to complement the theory sessions.

“There is no balance between theoretical and practical lessons. The problem is manifested when we go out for internships,” said Sandrine Mukase, a third year computer science student.

When contacted, Dr Bon Fils Safari, the director of academic quality at NUR admitted that there is need to improve the quality of education offered.

He explained that the implementation of the new module system which was introduced in 2008, faced many challenges, including the lack of academic inputs and students having to do with old infrastructure. The large number of students registered at the campus is another challenge.

“We are working on a way to solve these problems; we have ordered 200 new desktop computers for students’ laboratories. This, we hope will ease the pressure on the few available ones,” he said.

Jawahar Manickam, the university director of ICT centre revealed that a wireless internet network is set to be installed to enable students with personal computers to get connected. 

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