Sensitise the youth about the drug problem

Editor, Reading yesterday’s issue of this publication, my attention was attracted to an article written by Charles Kwizera ‘Drugs in schools: what stakeholders have to say’. The drug problem is our schools has been something that has been discussed in the highest levels.

Editor,

Reading yesterday’s issue of this publication, my attention was attracted to an article written by Charles Kwizera ‘Drugs in schools: what stakeholders have to say’.

The drug problem is our schools has been something that has been discussed in the highest levels. In fact, that particular issue also featured prominently during the 6th National Dialogue that took place late last year where it was resolved that all the parties concerned would put in place measures to ensure that this vice is halted once and for all.

A school administrator, who was quoted in the article, said that students get the drugs from centres near the schools. He voiced the need to clamp down on all the dealers who distributed drugs in the vicinity of the schools.

While he made sense, I think that merely cracking down on the dealers wouldn’t solve the problem. In economics, we learn that supply is driven by demand.

So, instead of using all the resources to crack down on the supply side, I believe that its imperative that the demand side, the students, are sensitized on the need to avoid drugs in the first place.

When I was in secondary school I saw many students use illicit substances but I refused to be part of this ring. Why?

Because in primary school I was taught to look at those substances as things that could destroy my brain cells. If we want to fight a war on drugs, we must put a lot of effort in teaching the children a better way.

Robinah Kakwanzi
Kampala

 

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