Rwanda Bureau of Standards – apply standards seriously.

It has been said before and will be said again, quality in Rwanda must come with a capital Q. As the Ministry of Commerce and Rwanda Bureau of Standards know, true success cannot be achieved in development without clearly thought-out benchmarks and blueprints. Clear targets must be set.

It has been said before and will be said again, quality in Rwanda must come with a capital Q.
As the Ministry of Commerce and Rwanda Bureau of Standards know, true success cannot be achieved in development without clearly thought-out benchmarks and blueprints. Clear targets must be set.

Of course, any matrix of standards must begin with a realistic strategy for implementation. Not only are standards not met, but the standard itself is undermined when asked, even begged from businesses and society. Quality customer-care, hospitality and society cannot be of a voluntary nature.

At the same time, setting an enforced yet unfair and too high set of standards which close down but all of a few major—already sustainable—businesses will only stifle entrepreneurial growth in the country, something that could be much stronger for a healthier, richer Rwanda.

Luckily, social and economic Darwinism is already in place in the form of accession into the East African Community. A wider and more competitive range of players throughout veteran economies in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda shall ultimately force all in this country to shape up or go out of business.

When Indian-owned Kenyan superstore Nakumatt opens its first branch in Kigali—slated for November 2008, just one year from now—it will have the potential to overrun thousands of local businesses simply because people everywhere want the best.

There is no reason for Rwandans to be different, and there is no reason for Rwandan businesses to think the Rwandan customer is any different.

It is better for all us here in Rwanda that we work together now, with our own government, to get up to the right class of service, rather than be bullied by neighbours  b later on. Once full economic, and later, financial integration is completed with East Africa, small, unprepared Rwandan businesses—and families—will be in for serious ‘shock therapy.’ So it is important to take advantage of the goals set by our domestic Bureau of Standards.

Rwanda Bureau of Standards – apply standards seriously.

 

It has been said before and will be said again, quality in Rwanda must come with a capital Q.
As the Ministry of Commerce and Rwanda Bureau of Standards know, true success cannot be achieved in development without clearly thought-out benchmarks and blueprints. Clear targets must be set.

Of course, any matrix of standards must begin with a realistic strategy for implementation. Not only are standards not met, but the standard itself is undermined when asked, even begged from businesses and society. Quality customer-care, hospitality and society cannot be of a voluntary nature.

At the same time, setting an enforced yet unfair and too high set of standards which close down but all of a few major—already sustainable—businesses will only stifle entrepreneurial growth in the country, something that could be much stronger for a healthier, richer Rwanda.

Luckily, social and economic Darwinism is already in place in the form of accession into the East African Community. A wider and more competitive range of players throughout veteran economies in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda shall ultimately force all in this country to shape up or go out of business.

When Indian-owned Kenyan superstore Nakumatt opens its first branch in Kigali—slated for November 2008, just one year from now—it will have the potential to overrun thousands of local businesses simply because people everywhere want the best.

There is no reason for Rwandans to be different, and there is no reason for Rwandan businesses to think the Rwandan customer is any different.

It is better for all us here in Rwanda that we work together now, with our own government, to get up to the right class of service, rather than be bullied by neighbours  b later on. Once full economic, and later, financial integration is completed with East Africa, small, unprepared Rwandan businesses—and families—will be in for serious ‘shock therapy.’ So it is important to take advantage of the goals set by our domestic Bureau of Standards.

 

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