Civil aviation body optimistic on aviation laws in 2010

The awaited Civil Aviation Act and Civil Aviation Security Act are expected to make the aviation business with autonomy to take quick decisions, officials have said. The regulations according to officials have a legal input from the East African Community EAC) and the Federal Aviation Administration from the United States of America.
Rwandair will benefit from the new jurisdiction. (File photo)
Rwandair will benefit from the new jurisdiction. (File photo)

The awaited Civil Aviation Act and Civil Aviation Security Act are expected to make the aviation business with autonomy to take quick decisions, officials have said.

The regulations according to officials have a legal input from the East African Community EAC) and the Federal Aviation Administration from the United States of America.

Recently during the commemoration of the 10th Anniversary of the EAC Aviation Symposium it was noted that one of the challenges the region is the safety requirements under the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). ICAO has set a target of 2012, a year all members should standardize to safety obligations.

The target is that no one region should have accident rates more than twice the global average by end of 2011. Statistics based from 2003 -2007 indicate that Africa air accident rates stood at 4.5 percent while global average was 0.5 percent.

Director General of Rwanda Civil Aviation Authority (RCAA), Dr. Richard Masozera said that the regulations are expected to be the top priority in the parliament and hopes by early next month it should be approved by both chambers.

Masozera said that the laws will give RCAA more autonomous in making quick decisions like inspections of aircrafts.

“It will help us in restructuring so that we can fulfill our regulatory and safety obligations better and in line with international recommended practices,” Masozera said.

International standards recommend autonomy to aviation institutions for quick decision making and many institutions are still attached to public service framework.

“Aviation is knowledge based and a time sensitive industry where quick decision making is crucial for its business,” he said.

According to Masozera, the law will enable RCAA to recruit and retain the appropriate skill personnel and build capacity to attract more flights.

He said that recruiting professionals in the industry is very expensive and so a mechanism to retain them is extremely important and should be in place.

Business in RCAA is expected to boom next year with the expansion plan in the pipeline.

Non-aeronautic revenues will be improved through rentals, office space for airlines operating at the airport, open restaurants, foods and beverages facility and duty free space are expected to increase.

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