We welcome France’s judicial cooperation

Editor, For over 15 years, I personally struggled with France’s reluctance towards dealing with the fugitives who masterminded and fuelled the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi. All this time I hardly understood why they could not get those guys hiding amidst their quarters.

Editor,

For over 15 years, I personally struggled with France’s reluctance towards dealing with the fugitives who masterminded and fuelled the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi. All this time I hardly understood why they could not get those guys hiding amidst their quarters.

The reasons seemed complex and intertwined within the box of Universal Jurisdiction, impunity, and whatever laws govern a state.

The facts that a number of the most wanted genocidaires were referred to French courts after their arrest, and later released was purely absurd. This only emphasised that Universal jurisdiction was worthless, unreliable and unreasonable.

Holding on to grudges is like adding salt to a wound; if a criminal with a long list of accusations backed by evidence is arrested, there is no reason for them to be released by any sane court.

Such procedural and substantive injustices simply demonstrate the complete lack of integrity and fairness of the law process.

It may look like law, but it’s not; it’s just politics. Perpetually releasing murder criminals, only spells, ‘We desire death while you desire life’ and this doesn’t make sense in the natural world.

One thing every Rwandan and French citizen needs to understand is that, there can never be peace without justice and truth.

For starters, the move towards mending the Rwanda-France distrust is welcome, if not a relief. Even if only the two French judges—Michele Ganascia and Fabienne Puos are in Rwanda talking to witnesses, it’s a positive sign that is representing the bigger picture of the possible success of France’s cooperation.

I strongly believe that, three things define the  world; truth, justice and peace. These three values are closely linked.

Working towards judicial cooperation is the definite way to go because it’s right, practical and beneficial for both France and Rwanda.

M. Iribagiza
Kigali

 

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