Is the world finally waking up?

Editor, It has proved to be a lucky Friday indeed. I got a delightful surprise when I opened The New Times website. I found out that a Canadian court had sentenced Désiré Munyaneza, 42, to life in prison for his role in the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, with no eligibility for parole in 25 years, the harshest penalty under Canadian law.
An artistic impression on sentenced genocidaire Désiré Munyaneza in a Canadian court
An artistic impression on sentenced genocidaire Désiré Munyaneza in a Canadian court

Editor,

It has proved to be a lucky Friday indeed. I got a delightful surprise when I opened The New Times website. I found out that a Canadian court had sentenced Désiré Munyaneza, 42, to life in prison for his role in the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, with no eligibility for parole in 25 years, the harshest penalty under Canadian law.

It’s gratifying to know that the Canadian judiciary is doing something about these criminals and not just wringing its hands in aghast.

Sadly, however, Canada still isn’t a no-go area for genocide perpetrators.  Canada hosts people like Leon Mugesera who should also be brought to book.

Mugesera lives in Quebec and is known for making inflammatory anti-Tutsi speeches where he told over 1000 ruling party members that: “we the people are obliged to take responsibility ourselves and wipe out this scum” and that they should kill Tutsis and “dump their bodies in River Nyabarongo to flow back to Abysinia”.

When this criminal, and others of his ilk, are brought to book, only shall I rate the international community, even higher.

Sam Rwego
Kimihurura

Leon Mugesera was tried by a Canadian court for inciting Genocide and lost but because Canada at that time did not have the war crimes law, the court could do nothing but order his deportation.

Mugesera has exhausted all legal channels and is awaiting deportation — Editor

 

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