PLE free of malpractices

District education officials in different parts of the country, declared  the national primary leaving Examinations(PLE) which started on Tuesday, as successful and free of malpractices.
PLE candidates who turned up for Exams at Gishara centre in Runda Sector of Kamonyi District, listen to instructions from leaders who included the State Minister for Primary and Secondary Education, Mathias Harebamungu.(Photo MINEDUC)
PLE candidates who turned up for Exams at Gishara centre in Runda Sector of Kamonyi District, listen to instructions from leaders who included the State Minister for Primary and Secondary Education, Mathias Harebamungu.(Photo MINEDUC)

District education officials in different parts of the country, declared  the national primary leaving Examinations(PLE) which started on Tuesday, as successful and free of malpractices.

In Bugesera District, the district official in-charge of education, Israeli Rwigema, said teachers who were recruited as supervisors were deployed in distant schools from their work stations- in an effort to minimise examination malpractices. 

A total of 5305 students from 72 schools sat for the exams in 21 examination centres, according to Rwigema.

“There were some difficulties because pupils were taking examinations in English for the first time…,” he said.

He cited misallocation of exam papers in Rilima centre, and giving examinations written in French to pupils who were supposed to sit English exams, as some of the anomalies encountered.

He however, added that the anomalies were immediately redressed.

Ngoma 
In Ngoma District, an estimated 4385 pupils from 63 schools sat for the examinations in 21 examination centres.

The district official in charge of education, Victoire Jamedari, said there was strict supervision to mitigate malpractices.

“Supervision is done by all stakeholders…local authorities and even  security organs. We formed a vigilant group to monitor the exercise on a daily basis,” he said. 

Jamedari urged parents against anxiety, saying exams are not punitive; but a routine way of evaluating students.

“Parents should not be worried over the language used which is English…pupils are mastering the language very fast,” he said. 

Rwamagana 
Out of 811 pupils who were meant to sit for the examinations in Rwamagana District, 785 turned up, the examination coordinator, Violette Mukeshimana disclosed.

“Some pupils fell sick, while some  could not continue having the exams, while one pupil was caught cheating and was consequently dismissed,” said Mukeshimana. 

At Gatagara School of children with visual impairment, The New Times witnessed the pupils busy taking their exams.

The teachers explained that pupils sit the same exams as those with normal visibility. They instead change the words to suit their understanding using a form of conversion known as Bray Alphate. 

“The only difference is that we need more preparation to get the materials required…some of which are imported from the USA or South Africa,” Jean Pierre Nteziryayo, the school’s head teacher said. 

Most of the pupils expressed optimism about the new changes introduced. 

Marcelline Nzamwitakuze, one of the pupils, said her target was to pass all the papers she sat for. 

Muhanga
Meanwhile, in Muhanga District, in the Southern Province, the exams were conducted at 23 sites in the district. Examination officials said the exams started on time.

“There were no major irregularities, except one case of epilepsy attack in Shogwe, cases caused by panic, and minor delays in Rutongo School-where exams set in French needed to be replaced by an English exam,” an official Claude Sebashi said.

The candidates however, expressed mixed feelings after the exams.

While some candidates said “it was as easy as attending morning mass”, others said “the English language was very complicated.”

The district examination officials commended pupils for the good conduct exhibited during the exams.

At total of 6258 pupils were expected to sit for the exams, 20 of them were however, reported to have dropped out of school. 

Ends

 

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