12 institutions under probe over shady Rwf 2bn tenders

KIGALI - Twelve government institutions are the subject of a covert investigation by the police’s Criminal Investigation Department (CID) to establish whether they released millions of francs in illegal tendering.
Prosecution Spokesperson, Augustin Nkusi
Prosecution Spokesperson, Augustin Nkusi

KIGALI - Twelve government institutions are the subject of a covert investigation by the police’s Criminal Investigation Department (CID) to establish whether they released millions of francs in illegal tendering.

The contentious issue mainly rotates around some government institutions who are hoodwinked by suppliers, who turn around and demand an increase on the originally agreed quotes citing change in market prices.

Contrary to what the law states, some government institutions have been budging to this pressure from suppliers and making adjustments, in some cases up to 100 percent increments.

The law states that a tender cannot increase beyond 20 percent without strict justifications.

“The CID has taken over the matter,” a source who declined to be named said on Monday by phone.

Though Prosecution Spokesperson, Augustin Nkusi, had earlier confirmed that twelve institutions were the target, he has since remained tight-lipped on the issue of naming the institutions under probe.

Nkusi had also revealed that the government could have lost over Rwf2bn in illegal tendering.

Prosecutor General, Martin Ngoga confirmed yesterday that a report involving the twelve institutions had been sent to CID “for scrutiny.”

“The CID is supposed to do the initial work ordinarily,” Ngoga said yesterday in a phone interview with The New Times.

CID boss Christophe Bizimungu could not be reached by press time as he was reportedly locked up in a meeting.
Police Spokesperson, Supt. Eric Kayiranga needed time to verify the matter.

According to the source, the government is very upset about “tenders being continuously awarded without following the normal procedures” and believes bosses in some institutions could be conniving with firms to cheat the State.

Tenders in ministries have raised many questions in the past with persistent reports that the process is always marred by lack of transparency and fair competition to potential contractors.

Controversial tenders have so far landed many government officials in jail.

Almost the entire internal tender committee members in the Ministry of Infrastructure are in Kacyiru Court to explain why they sanctioned the additional funds to Alexis Mugarura, owner of EMA, a construction firm contracted to build eastern provincial headquarters without following normal tendering process.

Ends

 

Have Your SayLeave a comment