Africa’s story through art

Collin Sekajugo’s long waited solo outdoor art exhibition served as a breadth of fresh-air alternative to galleries—and his well established work unearthed his unique flair and originality. People from different walks of life attended the art exhibition, which was graced by elegant dances and drumbeats by Rwamakondera children’s dance troupe.
L-R : Collin Sekajugo;Jeffrey Boyd - Washington D.C.(photo by H.F. Goodman)
L-R : Collin Sekajugo;Jeffrey Boyd - Washington D.C.(photo by H.F. Goodman)

Collin Sekajugo’s long waited solo outdoor art exhibition served as a breadth of fresh-air alternative to galleries—and his well established work unearthed his unique flair and originality.

People from different walks of life attended the art exhibition, which was graced by elegant dances and drumbeats by Rwamakondera children’s dance troupe.

The high-end venue known for catering to all tastes and needs of its clients, Heaven Restaurant has become the hotbed for artists and art lovers alike.

The ‘Sekajugo Regenerated’ solo exhibition began Thursday October 22, at 6.30pm—and continues till October 24. His most expensive art piece costs $1500.

The low profile Sekajugo said that his solo exhibition is aimed at bringing back his image of creativity on social affairs, and to show people how art is used to communicate.

“I felt I had to bring back my image in terms of revival,” Sekajugo said, “I’ve grown in experience and I’ve an old soul, though I’m still young in age.”

Sekajugo’s paintings are unique in genre. He uses cloth, backcloth and paintings. Sekajugo says that he discovered his talent when he was a teenager, and he has become popular among Rwandan art lovers, as well as tourists who visit the country.

The 27-year-old painter says his greatest achievement is the establishment of Ivuka Arts Studio and the Rwamakondera children dance group. He has also represented Rwanda in various regional and international art exhibitions.

Compliments from art lovers at launch: 
“The paintings are great because they portray the tragedy—the artist must be brilliant and talented to tell a story through art.” Jeffrey Boyd - Washington D.C.

“I appreciate the paintings, especially the one of the dancers, saying that it portrays peace and life—I love the colours, and the movements of the dancers.” Rachel Weber - New York City.

“Sekajugo’s art talks more of the rare things that happen in our daily lives. Someone would be right to say that he falls in the first category of the globally recognised visual artists of his time. He tells the story of an African community with the use of paint.” Edwin Musoni - Kigali.

 “I’m not good at interpreting art, but I value Collin’s work, and I think he is among the best painters in the country. I also love his Rwamakondera children dance group.”  Shanel - Kigali.

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