Is having a long life something worth aspiring?

Recent research on child mortality rates has shown that half of the children born in the world’s richest countries will live to up to 100 years. However, even though the findings seem amazing, the world still can’t save millions of children dying before the age of five.

Recent research on child mortality rates has shown that half of the children born in the world’s richest countries will live to up to 100 years. However, even though the findings seem amazing, the world still can’t save millions of children dying before the age of five.

The international aid agency, Save the Children, is trying to convince everyone that a relatively small amount of money can radically reduce the number of children who die needlessly each year.

But somebody should still ask: “has Save the Children failed in its mission statement because its failed to save at least a quarter of the children that die before the age of five every year?”

India is high on Save the Children’s list of priority nations. The NGO argues that despite India’s rapid economic growth, the child mortality and child malnutrition rates remain shocking. With 490,000 children dying annually on the first day of their lives, India accounts for more than 20 percent of infant deaths globally.

Is Africa in a better position than India? Or are Save the Children’s priorities wrong? I don’t think that Africa is doing any better where child mortality and malnutrition is concerned.

While having almost half of the babies being born in rich countries now living to an average of 100 years is a remarkable statistic, which shows a huge improvement in public health and living standards made over recent decades, but is it really good news?

If in developed countries, the elderly can be subjected to discrimination and live poor conditions, imagine how those in poorer nations fare? One finds that many live in a very piteous state. But the question remains: “if you could choose to, would you like to live to 100?

I guess living as long as possible is everyone’s wish. Those over seventy will tell you that “life is sweet”. Even those that have lived beyond 100 will still think that death is ugly. We want to live on and on.

But is living to as long as we wish a worthwhile aspiration? Or have we got our life priorities wrong?

Is becoming a centurion such an accomplishment that’s worth celebrating? Should we worry about getting older? If you do, what changes do you think our society needs to make to help older people live more comfortable and happy lives?

phatari@yahoo.co.uk

The author is a social commentator

 

Have Your SayLeave a comment