Would you take your daughter to a single sex school? (Yes I would)

I studied in a country (Uganda) where only girls from single schools appeared in the newspapers for their excellent examination performances. Of course there were some exceptions from mixed schools but those weren’t a huge number. And when I get asked whether I would take my daughter to a single school, I say “yes”.
Patrick Buchana
Patrick Buchana

I studied in a country (Uganda) where only girls from single schools appeared in the newspapers for their excellent examination performances. Of course there were some exceptions from mixed schools but those weren’t a huge number. And when I get asked whether I would take my daughter to a single school, I say “yes”.

The results of the study carried out by UCLA’s Linda J. Sax compares the achievements, aspirations and behaviors of 6,552 graduates of 225 independent girls’ schools and 14,684 of their peers from 1,169 coeducational independent schools.

The report’s findings reveal that girls’ school graduates consistently assess their abilities, engagement and ambition as either above average or in the top 10 percent. Compared to their co-ed counterparts, they are more likely to pursue careers in engineering, (typically male dominated), engage in political discussions (switch from being seen and not heard), keep current with political affairs, and see college as a steppingstone to graduate school (we’re talking schools here).

Studies show that girls usually go through puberty between the ages of 10 – 15 years, and this is the time they are in their senior three or senior four. Putting them in a mixed school is like putting them in their puberty trap. They are maturing and realizing that they are sexually attracted to the opposite sex. And the same is also happening to their male counterparts, it’s very easy to trigger some kind of sexually vices as school. On the other hand, girls in single sex schools usually have a normal puberty stage and move on with school.

Single sex schools help a girl to have that bit of her life when she can do anything without parents around and without the opposite sex to judge her. She can do sports if she is interested, dance when needed, and many other things teens enjoy doing. This stage of life isn’t experienced in mixed schools yet it’s a very significant part of growth and helps girls to avoid having a mid-life crisis.

All in all, it all gets back to the same thing - she will meet the boys when she leaves school. It’s not like hiding your daughter in a castle away from boys, it’s just giving her time to be a girl and mature into a woman.

 

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