Who is sabotaging bio-diesel project?

Dear Editor,thanks business times for blowing the whistle. Bio-diesel is an alternative source of energy to fossil fuel that is quite suitable for Rwanda.
Niyibizi Ananie, a senior research technician at the IRST Kigali research station, explains to Rwanda Defence Forces personnel how bio-disiel is produced. The New Times / File photo
Niyibizi Ananie, a senior research technician at the IRST Kigali research station, explains to Rwanda Defence Forces personnel how bio-disiel is produced. The New Times / File photo

Dear Editor,

thanks business times for blowing the whistle. Bio-diesel is an alternative source of energy to fossil fuel that is quite suitable for Rwanda.

Fossil fuels (petrol, diesel, parafin etc), contain higher amounts of carbon compounds, which have a massive negative effect on climate change. I urge stakeholders in the bio-diesel sector to watch an insightful documentary which is freely accessible on YouTube titled Thrive.

It is about how multinational fossil fuel companies are deliberately fighting against the development of alternative sources of energy by even influencing policymakers with huge amounts of bribes and frustrating researchers. It has now gone to as far as assassinating prospective scientists, according to Thrive.

When you examine the feasibility of the bio-diesel project and the efforts made by the Scientific and Technological Research Institute, you realise that something somewhere must be going wrong, but not at IRST.

Remember, if the project can reduce the fossil fuel imports to 50 by 2015, then Kobil, Total, Shell, ENGEN etc, would be in trouble of closing shop.

The documentary Thrive shows how one genius engineer named Tosla was frustrated by one of America’s most powerful bank, from developing his free energy concept. Investigations showed that the bank was the sole funding entity for production of copper wires in America.

This means that production of free energy would have put the bank out of business.

Rwanda is not an island in the modern era of economic, technological and social development. We should work towards development of systems which will benefit our children and generations to follow.

The world’ worst challenges revolve around self-centred mentalities - those who can’t think beyond ‘myself, my spouse and my children’.

James Munanura, Makerere University

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Dear Editor,

The best and urgent solution is to privatise this project and let it operate on its own, acquire its own resources and generate its income by selling the oil. Otherwise, there is a need to intervene. Laws are made by people and are not in stone.

Rutagarama, Kigali

 

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