Good roads will boost economy

Reactions on industrialists’ call for the next budget to focus on improving the supply chain:
Lydie Hakizimana, the chairperson of Young Entrepreneurs, last week said for one to start a business, they don’t need a lot of money.  The New Times / File
Lydie Hakizimana, the chairperson of Young Entrepreneurs, last week said for one to start a business, they don’t need a lot of money. The New Times / File

Reactions on industrialists’ call for the next budget to focus on improving the supply chain:

Dear Editor,

My take is that if we had good passable feeder roads in the countryside our production and cost of living numbers would be the highest in the region.

Check on any product and where its raw material is grown, you will agree with me.

We have areas where pineapples cost a quarter of the price in other areas. The story is same for bananas, sorghum, maize and other fruits. Raw milk still costs Rwf130 in mny places, while in others it is at between Rwf250 and Rwf300. The main reason to explain this gap is access. Bicycle transport cannot play a big role if we want to revolutionise the supply chain and put money in the pockets of rural folk.

The cost of farm implements, inputs, acaricides, animal drugs, farm labour are still being subsidised from the owners’ off-farm income. And this can only make him worse-off economically, not better.

John, Ndego, Kayonza

----------------------------------

Dear Editor,

It is a wonderful idea, but how does this statements reach the youth themselves. Most youths don’t reach out to the forums.

Bill
, Nairobi

-----------------------------------

We are tired of your ‘sweet’ rhetoric

Last week, Business Times published a story, “You don’t need money, but brains to start a business”, hereunder are reactions from readers:

Dear Editor,

This statement is nothing but just another proof of sweet rhetoric from most officials who want to impress their audiences. You surely need money and brains to start a business. The two go together. How can an idea be translated into a business venture if there is no financial support (the money)?

Having a good project proposal is not a guarantee that one will easily have access to the so-called business start-up loan facility. A few people have succeeded, but the majority are crying. This is a fact most of the official statements are not pointing out.

Everywhere, everybody is painting a perfect picture, but the reality on the ground is totally different. And they keep blaming the youth for not coming up with “real business” ideas. Give me a break!

Gilbert Kamali, Kigali

 

Have Your SayLeave a comment