Kasawuli’s pride is to see his pupils excel

Struggling  to make it in life is what motivates Brian Kasawuli to go to the classroom every day. The head teacher of Alpha Community Academy in Kanombe is   known for his social character and passion for English subject. Many eloquent  students have  passed through the hands of the 28-year-old.  Ben Gasore caught up with him to discover the secret behind his budding leadership and teaching career.

Struggling  to make it in life is what motivates Brian Kasawuli to go to the classroom every day. The head teacher of Alpha Community Academy in Kanombe is   known for his social character and passion for English subject. Many eloquent  students have  passed through the hands of the 28-year-old.  Ben Gasore caught up with him to discover the secret behind his budding leadership and teaching career.

Who is Brian Kasawuli?

Brian is like any other ordinary person only that I am really very determined and passionate about my work. That is how I ended up in this country. I was looking for a place to teach.

Where did you study from?

I was at Makerere College School for Ordinary Level and Lubiri Secondary School for Advanced Level. I also went to Kyamboggo University from where I graduated with a bachelors in Education majoring in Literature in English. So I am now a secondary school teacher of English. Don’t be surprised that I am here teaching in a primary school.

Why did you choose to be a teacher?

Well, I used to really admire writing, mainly poetry. However, I used to feel teaching would help students learn a lot from me. So the urge to teach was always there in me. That is why when I went to King David Academy in 2010, the proprietor gave me a chance and after only two terms I was made headmaster there.

Which schools have you worked with before?

In Uganda, I taught in a school called Princess Diana in Munyonyo, Kampala. After that I came to Rwanda where I taught at King David Academy and later joined Alpha Community Academy where I am currently working.

What activities do you do in your leisure time?

In my free time I do painting. Though I did not pursue art at a professional level, I really enjoy playing with the paint and coming up with something that you can put in the school compound. I even made a ‘Pride, Character, Discipline’ art piece, similar to one hanging in Harvard University’s buildings. I also watch movies at night with a critical eye. I always look at the positives we can learn from them.

What are your best and worst moments in your career?

Well, I am this person who feels he is always a leader everywhere I go. I could say the worst moment is when people don’t perform to their best. You need to always give your best because the rewards are yours. It is like keeping money in the bank. It is my worst moment when I see children playing a lot and not seeing the purpose in education.

My best moment was when I was at King David and was made the headmaster. I was a bit worried about the promotion. I didn’t know I could make it. But then I came up with many different methods here and there and made a lot of research on how I could help this school. Then when it came to the students sitting for their final exams they came third in Kigali in the Arts combinations. I was so happy when we achieved that feat. I always want to achieve things.

What would you have been if you had not become a teacher?

I would have gone in for Law. Actually that was my first priority. With time, I got so attached to teaching and literature that my school-mates used to nickname me ‘Shakespeare.’

Who is your role model?

I admire William Shakespeare. He was a great writer and an amazing teacher. He had this style of looking at human nature and transforming it into writing where one could see some human vices. Apart from Shakespeare, Martin Luther King comes second and also Nelson Mandela. These are people who fight for a noble cause and sacrifice themselves for others.

Is there anything that the public or your students do not know about you?

They have never seen my temper. They even don’t know if I can get angry. They always see a jolly and fun Brian and I always believe that the best way to develop children’s learning is by being friendly with them. In that way they can trust you and learn from you. For example I am teaching English in primary six and primary five and they are performing better in it than any other subject.

Any last words to parents?

They should urge their children to maintain discipline and concentrate on their studies because they have to work for their own wealth when they grow up.

 

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