Feminism and the hook up culture; is there a link?

As I was perusing my favourite online magazines, I came across an article that was discussing the downsides of the “hook-up” culture in universities. Young men and women across the world in university are currently learning about the dos and don’ts of the college lifestyle, the late nights, the horrible diets and for most, the constant partying that comes with the need to explore the aspect of sex or in university-speak, ‘hooking up’.

As I was perusing my favourite online magazines, I came across an article that was discussing the downsides of the “hook-up” culture in universities. Young men and women across the world in university are currently learning about the dos and don’ts of the college lifestyle, the late nights, the horrible diets and for most, the constant partying that comes with the need to explore the aspect of sex or in university-speak, ‘hooking up’.

Professor Donna Freitas of Boston University recently released her book that explored this lifestyle and stated that people should no longer ignore this trend and instead realize the effect it has on young people. Grownups in their lives should incorporate it more in their conversations on campus and at home. Some authors agreed with her and others did not. One author agreed that it was good that Frietas was not condemning these young people but instead encouraging dialogue. Others disagreed with the fact that Freitas claimed that feminism helped spread this concept of hooking up with no emotion or care for consequences and also that the impact was not as long-term or influential in a person’s life as she stated. 

Personally, I am all for people talking because if it becomes more public, people will not be shy to talk about the dark side of hooking up such as STD’s or pregnancy or for some people who may have been put in a situation of assault.

These days it is very common for women to have gone through some kind of sexual assault but yet, society is not ready to deal with them. The other day, I also read an article about how rappers glamorize the idea of “popping a molly” but for the women who have been date raped it isn’t as funny.   In Rwanda, I have heard a lot about young women who get sexually assaulted being too scared to report it. In some cases, they were either not supposed to be out or their parents do not know they go out. But it all comes down to being afraid of their parents. 

Rwandan parents need to be more understanding of their children and knowing that times have changed.

Parents should have an open door policy and make sure they teach their children that there are some bad people out in this world.

Do you think Freitas is right to encourage this dialogue or should we continue blaming hip hop and media for creating this myth like some of her critics claim?

 

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