Death should not take such a heavy toll on Rwandans

Cases of malaria are going down, there is free HIV testing nationwide, health policies set up by the government are actually working and the fact is that even the poorest Rwandan can afford health insurance (Mutelle de Sante).

Cases of malaria are going down, there is free HIV testing nationwide, health policies set up by the government are actually working and the fact is that even the poorest Rwandan can afford health insurance (Mutelle de Sante).

The above is just a hint at just how bright Rwanda’s health sector is. As the World Health Organisation (WHO) Health Summit gains momentum, and as they battle through various issues pertaining to Africa’s health status continues, Rwanda is carefully mastering the primary steps.

Besides, there are certain things that a proper government, that cares about its citizens, will not ignore; in this particular case, healthcare development as a basic human right. Rural or urban, every Rwandan has a right to proper health.

Today, the people of Rwanda enjoy and exploit an affordable health insurance popularly known as ‘Mutuelle.’

This is a ‘one of a kind’ in the region and the world at large. Nowhere else will you find, anyone getting health insurance at a fee of Rwf 1000 (about $1.8 US per year).

This is proudly Rwandan and what’s thrilling is that the most vulnerable people in the least accessed regions within the country can get free medicine and treatment at a giveaway price.

They say, ‘experience is the best teacher.’ People who learn through this method, will agree that they learn pretty well because what they experience leaves a strong imprint on their lives. Well, this is my story.

Two weeks ago, I woke up one morning and decided to go to the Far East, my destination being Mulindi Health Centre, in Kirehe district, Eastern Province, a few minutes away from Tanzania’s border.

Even though I sat on a motorcycle taxi for hours, riding up and down tiny paths on rocky hills because I decided to take a shortcut, the journey was worthwhile.

As was bound to happen, I ended up covered in a fine film of reddish-brown dust. I thought I’d fit right in-assuming, mistakenly, that everyone else looked just like me.

My first glance at the Mulindi Health Centre, in Kirehe district left me with shock and mouth all agape. The centre looked nicer than the one in Kimironko.

Rural health centres offering the same services like any other health centre elsewhere, means that Rwanda’s drafted policies to tackle disease and poverty in the remotest places are working.

This only proves the fact that Rwanda takes its citizens seriously; a high mortality rate is going to be a thing of the past.

anyglorian@yahoo.com

 

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