Dealing with the physical changes during pregnancy

There are lots of changes that come once pregnancy sets it. Some of the physical changes can become a sore point especially for first time mothers. However, all these changes have different ways of being dealt with.

There are lots of changes that come once pregnancy sets it. Some of the physical changes can become a sore point especially for first time mothers. However, all these changes have different ways of being dealt with.

Your breasts. Early in your pregnancy they will feel tender and may be larger. As the pregnancy progresses and your breasts prepare for breastfeeding, they get even bigger and may leak an early form of milk called colostrum. Make sure you wear a well-fitting bra that provides both comfort and support. If your breasts are tender, ask your partner not to touch them.

Frequent urination. If you know the location of every bathroom between your house, the supermarket, work and the mall, don’t despair. Your blood volume increases during pregnancy, putting increased pressure on your kidneys. Later in pregnancy the weight of the baby on your bladder increases the pressure, making you feel like you always have to go.

Mouth and tooth changes. Your body needs extra calcium for the baby; if you don’t provide it through your diet, it will steal it from your bones and teeth. You may also find that your gums bleed more easily, thanks to pregnancy hormones. Get your teeth and gums checked early in your pregnancy but avoid x-rays and follow good dental care with regular brushing.

Aches and pains. During pregnancy, ligaments and tendons throughout your body stretch, both to accommodate the growing baby and to allow the baby out during labor. This can lead to achiness and even pain, particularly in the lower abdomen. Acetaminophen or ibuprofen can help, as can exercise. Ibuprofen is however generally not recommended after 28 weeks.

Leg cramps. You may experience sudden leg cramps, feel that something is crawling on your legs or have an uncontrollable urge to move your legs, particularly at night. This symptom may be caused by low iron or potassium. Stretching your legs before bed and getting regular exercise can help; you might also try adding a potassium-rich banana to your diet. Ask your health care professional to test your iron levels; if they are too low, you may need a higher iron supple.

Even as you get rounder and your feet get swollen, just remember that it will be worth it once you have your beautiful baby in your arms.

 

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