New York Saxophonist entertains at huye expo

A New York saxophonist Jeremy Danneman, has treated Huye residents with a taste of his music during the ongoing mini expo.
The suspect:  Odethe Nyirangendahimana outside  Ndego police station.
The suspect: Odethe Nyirangendahimana outside Ndego police station.

A New York saxophonist Jeremy Danneman, has treated Huye residents with a taste of his music during the ongoing mini expo.

At the trade exposition in Huye, residents thronged the district stadium to listen to Danneman’s exotic  tunes.

Before performing at the expo the saxophonist had performed in Kigali’s Kimironko market and some parts of the city centre.
“I have never seen that kind of instrument.

To me  the music is strange but soothing, however  the whole idea of an American playing music in a gathering of such a nature for free is confusing,” said Emmanuel Ntakirutimana, at the trade exposition.

But Jeremy Danneman is a man on a personal mission. “I am here to commemorate and remember the horror of 1994 and to celebrate 15 years by Rwandans of growing peace, unity, and stability through making melodies,” he says.

“It is important for people all over the world to be having fun, because if people are having a good time, maybe they will think twice before ruining it with wars and genocide.”

“When you make such a public performance and you manage to bring people together, this is good.

I get satisfaction just seeing people coming together to enjoy music,” he added.

From the comfort of his New York home in Brooklyn, Danneman said that he read about the recent history on Rwanda, about the Genocide and about the amazing progress that the country has made over the last 15 years.

“So I felt now this year being the 15th anniversary was the time for me to come and play music here,” said the youthful saxophonist who has played the instrument since he was 9.

Asked why he chose Rwanda for his musical tour, he said, “I think that Rwanda is unique because it went from a very dark chapter  to become a showcase for the world,” adding, “right now it is difficult to tell if you don’t know what happened 15 years ago that the whole country was in chaos.

I think that it is very unique.”

“At the Kimironko market people were enthusiastic about my music, they were happy when they were told why I am playing music locally.” he said.

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