MTN warns of Internet disruptions

RESPONSIBILITY Telecom giant explains glitches Following the EASSy cable disruptions detected between Djibouti and Port Sudan, which carries the majority of international Internet traffic, MTN Rwanda warns that Internet subscribers might face some inconsistency with Internet speed.
Doing ground work. The fibre optic cable system connects countries of eastern Africa to the rest of the world. The New Times / File.
Doing ground work. The fibre optic cable system connects countries of eastern Africa to the rest of the world. The New Times / File.

RESPONSIBILITY Telecom giant explains glitches

Following the EASSy cable disruptions detected between Djibouti and Port Sudan, which carries the majority of international Internet traffic, MTN Rwanda warns that Internet subscribers might face some inconsistency with Internet speed.

Over 21 per cent of Internet users on the MTN Rwanda connection are experiencing internet glitches of which the operator has attributed to EASSy’s cable breakdown.

In a statement issued Monday, MTN said, “Due to these cuts, especially on routes undersea and in remote areas, we are facing challenges in offering bandwidth to full capacity.”

Eighty percent of MTN’s traffic is through the EASSy undersea cable that is linked through Tanzania.

 “We are also currently working with other providers to see how the service can be restored as soon as possible. We are looking at alternative solutions with other providers to offer subscribers with uninterrupted Internet connection,” the statement said.

MTN’s Chief Marketing Officer, Yvonne Manzi Makolo explained that the impact is substantial as they are remaining with 20 percent of their capacity.

 “We have currently channelled all our traffic through an alternative route through Uganda. The company managing the EASSy cable has dispatched a vessel to fix the problem.”

The Eastern Africa Submarine Cable System (EASSy) is an undersea fibre optic cable system connecting countries of eastern Africa to the rest of the world.

EASSy runs from Mtunzini in South Africa to Port Sudan in Sudan, with landing points in nine countries. It is connected to at least ten landlocked countries—which will no longer have to rely on satellite Internet access to carry voice and data services.

The project, partially funded by the World Bank, was initiated on January 2003, when selected companies studied its feasibility. The cable entered service on July, 16, 2010 with commercial service starting on July 30, 2010.

MTN Group is among the owners of the cable, making MTN Rwanda an automatic user. 

 

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