Society Debate : Is humanitarianism selective?

If it wasn’t, the world would be a better place! Today I would like to begin my defense with a correlation between two countries; Somalia and Iraq. Somalia produces small quantities of gemstones and salt; it also has small untapped deposits of feldspar, gypsum, uranium, iron ore, kaolin, limestone and natural gas.
Ivan Mugisha
Ivan Mugisha

If it wasn’t, the world would be a better place!

Today I would like to begin my defense with a correlation between two countries; Somalia and Iraq.

Somalia produces small quantities of gemstones and salt; it also has small untapped deposits of feldspar, gypsum, uranium, iron ore, kaolin, limestone and natural gas.

The deserted country’s mineral industry contributes little to its exports and economy in general.

Somalia, which is now torn between South and North, is also one of the world’s most suffering places where children, men and women die daily due to embarrassing situations that can be avoided.

When a Somali child survives a bullet, she will certainly die of hunger.

Enter Iraq; as one of the most oil-rich countries in the world, Iraq’s economy has been fueled by its oil reserves, also acting as its major export.

Just like Somalia, war has been the order of the day in Iraq, killing as many people as possible in a little space of time.

However, most of the world’s attention is focused on the war in Iraq and not on the reality of the sadness in Somalia.

I am certain that rich humanitarian individuals and countries are quite aware of the situation in Somalia, but because the country is generally low on natural resources or other incentives, few humanitarians are willing to risk their work.

I mean, who would want to engage with a war torn area that has nothing to offer?

Although Somalia clearly needs more aid and assistance, it is subjected to residues from humanitarians and a few sacks of maize flour from the UN, which is only good at stagnating it in its wretched and desperate condition.

On the other hand, despite the unending war it is facing, Iraq is enjoying an outsized attraction of humanitarian aid, both from the countries responsible for its current war and from the often bullied UN.

There is no question as to why Iraq is more important to them than Somalia; Somalia’s only sin is its lack of attractive stones and that coveted thick black liquid that keeps industries on their feet.

Had it been that Somalia owned a lake of oil, I guarantee you that the Al Shabaab rebels who are killing people indiscriminately would be history now.

American jets would be hovering over the lake day and night and UN would build an electric fence around it and this would bring some peace to the region.

As it turns out, these humanitarian leaders prefer to put all their efforts together to liberate Iraq from Al Qaeda, a group far more dangerous  and organized than Al Shabaab—all because Iraq has what they might need in the end.

Away from Somali and Iraq, even faith based organizations, which are supposed to act like the epitome of humanitarianism, are also dealing in this unfair practice of selective humanitarian assistance.

When Haiti was hit with a devastating earthquake, almost all evangelists on Paul Crouch’s TBN announced outreach programs to the area. However, when Mountain Nyiragongo in eastern Congo erupted in 2002, killing people and destroying property, preaching went on uninterrupted. You can judge for yourself.

Of course there are undoubted humanitarians out there who give without prejudice and I urge them to keep up the good work.

However, those elements who give with one hand and take away with another must know that the world is completely disappointed in them.

mugishaivan@yahoo.com

 

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