The Disadvantages of Flowers

Even with the most careful, well-planned garden, there are still disadvantages to having flowers. The colorful landscape that you might desire could have hidden problems that are unmanageable. These situations would be best remedied by not having flowers in the yard at all.
Sometimes flowers are too costly!
Sometimes flowers are too costly!

Even with the most careful, well-planned garden, there are still disadvantages to having flowers. The colorful landscape that you might desire could have hidden problems that are unmanageable. These situations would be best remedied by not having flowers in the yard at all.

Poisonous
Nature has given some plants protection from animals through poisonous foliage. Lily of the valley is a pleasantly scented, spring perennial. Digestive upset and irregular heart beat can occur if the foliage of lily of the valley is eaten.

Consuming the leaves of foxglove, a tall perennial flower, can cause the heart to beat so irregularly, it could be fatal. Seek immediate medical attention for anyone thought to have eaten any part of poisonous plants.

Allergies
Plants produce pollen in the spring, summer and sometimes fall to make seeds for next year’s growth. Pollen is a leading cause of seasonal allergies, which, for sufferers, is a strong disadvantage to having flowers.

Common flowers like sunflower and daisy can cause terrible allergy attacks, and, if left untreated, can lead to severe discomfort.

Jasmine vine and juniper pollen also cause allergic reactions in many people, among numerous other plants and trees.

Timely Maintenance
Flowers require routine maintenance to keep them looking their best. You will need to devote enough time each week to pruning and deadheading, a process that eliminates spent blooms to conserve the plant’s energy.

The flowers will also need water each day to several days, and a fertilizer treatment one to three times per month.

Costly Investment
Flowers are available in an assortment of sizes and cultivars, each priced for value and endurance. For example, perennials (flowers that return each year) would cost more than annuals (flowers that live, bloom and die within one growing season.)

In comparison, a flower that is expected to spread and multiply rapidly would cost more than one that takes years to expand and progress in size.

Homeowners admire perennials since they return the following year; however, the initial investment is often pricey.

On the other hand, annuals require a minimal investment, yet they do not come back. Because of this, an annual may be seen as a waste of money, which, often over time, accumulates into a larger investment than previously believed.

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