Women urged to partake in parliamentary polls

The National Women Council has called on Rwandan women to seek nominations for parliamentary elections slated for September this year. Nadege Imbabazi.

The National Women Council has called on Rwandan women to seek nominations for parliamentary elections slated for September this year.

The call was made Thursday as grassroots women representatives from across Eastern Province met to discuss their in the promotion of good governance of the country.

The meeting aimed at strategising for the forthcoming elections for members of the Lower House.

The chamber is comprised of 80 lawmakers.

Besides women who are voted through universal adult suffrage via political organisations, there are 24 seats that are reserved for women who are voted for through electoral colleges as a special interest group.

Women can also contest for parliamentary elections under the two other special interest groups; the youth (two seats) and people with disabilities (one seat).

Ruth Mukarumashana, who represented the National Electoral Commission (NEC) at the meeting, said that despite the impressive representation of women in the current parliament and in other positions of leadership, there is still more room for women in leadership.

“The Government has trust in us, but we are not using that opportunity as much. This should be our time to prove ourselves,” Mukarumashana told them.

Yvette Dusenge, a facilitator, told the hundreds of women delegates that, to be able to seize this opportunity, women to define what they want and where they need to be, starting from at personal level.

“Our country has vision, and, as women, we need vision too,” said Dusenge, adding that women should look at where they came from to be able to appreciate what can be achieved with determination.  

The Executive Secretary of National Women Council, Jacqueline Kamanzi, also called upon women to sign up as volunteers with the National Electoral Commission for the upcoming elections.

“We should participate in the electoral process from the start to the end. We want to see more women involvement in observing the polls, as polling agents, among other roles.”

Kamanzi, however, said that vying for parliamentary seats should not be taken as a given, saying that those considering running should be clear about what they need to do for the people and must strive to deliver on those promises once elected.

The women were also challenged not to compromise on their roles in their families, saying that civic consciousness requires balancing family and public duties.

editorial@newtimes.co.rw

 

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